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Should I accept a counter offer?

  • October 31, 2017

You’ve landed yourself a new job, plucked up the courage and handed in your resignation, and you’re busy planning out your career at your new company. Then your employer takes you aside, expresses their reluctance to see you go and offers you more salary and additional benefits. In an environment of skills shortages, counter offers are commonplace, but should you accept it if offered?

Why did you resign in the first place?

While the thought of your company really wanting you to stay with them might appear flattering, take a moment to consider why you are in this position in the first place.  You made the decision to apply for new job and it stands to reason that there was a sound reason to do so. Perhaps it was because you felt your achievements weren’t being recognised or that there wasn’t the career progression opportunities available to you. So while it might initially seem fantastic that you have received a counter offer, you decided to leave and regardless of what you have been offered, your reasons for doing so still stand.

A question of loyalty

Another important point to consider is what your resignation tells your employer about your commitment to the company. While you might have been the perfect employee, the moment you hand your resignation in your loyalty will always be in question.  So if you’re considering accepting a counter offer think carefully about how you will be perceived at the company afterwards. While you might think that, by enticing you to stay, your boss obviously deems you too valuable to lose, the fact remains that they will look at you in a different way – it’s purely human nature to do so.  And this can have negative connotations for your future at the business if you do decide to stay put.

Is it just a stop gap?

Another complex issue surrounding counter offers is that you don’t know what it going on behind the scenes and the real reason your employer is asking you to stay.  If your company is experiencing heavy workloads, for example, and doesn’t have ample people waiting in the wings to fill your role, it could very well be that they are viewing the counter offer as a way to plug the gap until a replacement can be found.  And this feeling can be incredibly negative for you and the company – a situation soon arises where your employer is questioning your loyalty to the business and you are consumed with the fear that you might soon be replaced.

Think long and hard before you make the decision

While being offered more money or benefits can initially seem very appealing, our experience shows us that it can lead to a feeling of unease for both employer and employee alike. It’s really important to weigh up the pros and cons before you make a move.  If you decide to proceed with your new job, ensure you thank your boss for the offer and reassure them that you will be committed to your role during your notice period. And if you decide to take up the counter offer, bear in mind that you will probably have to work hard to win back your employer’s trust.

Call the team today for information about how Clayton Recruitment can assist your firm with recruitment and retention strategies. And for more insights from the team take a look at our other blogs and resources.

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Why managing your online reputation is crucial

  • June 28, 2017

While social media can be an excellent way of promoting your individual brand and add a personal context to your CV, it also has the potential to significantly damage your online reputation and may hinder you in your search for your next role. There is no way of knowing what the long term implications of posting content online will be, a status or photo that may seem harmless at the time may discourage a future employer from taking you seriously, or considering you for the position at all.

Protect your online reputation

According to research conducted by cyber security experts Norton, millennials need to be more conscious about their digital footprint. More than a quarter of 18-34 year olds have no idea what appears when their name is searched online, and perhaps more worryingly 48% of hiring managers indicated that they chose not to take on an applicant after discovering something on their social platforms. Moreover social media is a standard used by recruiters to help them select appropriate candidates for interview. So how can you manage your online reputation, and ensure that it bolsters your CV, rather than hinders your job prospects?

Start by googling yourself. This is the first step that any recruiter or potential employer will take, so it’s important that you know what they’re likely to find. As the number of social media profiles we have steadily increases, so too does the amount of information potential employers are able to find out. So it’s important to check your privacy settings. While you may want to have more professional platforms such as LinkedIn and Twitter open to the public, it’s unlikely that you’ll want employers to be able to trawl through your personal photos on Facebook or Instagram.

What would a potential employer think?

It’s also worth considering the type of content you are posting on your profiles and the impression this might give to a future employer. It’s definitely not advisable to post potentially embarrassing photos on any of your public profiles, or to ignore unprofessional ones you might have been tagged in. In addition it’s worth bearing in mind how a rant about how awful your day at work has been might look to someone thinking about hiring you. Impulsive updates are also not a good idea – take Donald Trump for example, who has launched countless Twitter rants and now faces a serious backlash which is likely to hurt his campaign for the most powerful job in the world.

Social media can be great at demonstrating your personality, however in terms of advancing your career it’s important that you find the right balance between personal and professional updates. You might want to tweet pictures of the salad you had for lunch, but you might want to counter that with a link to a recent blog you have written, or write about a professional development course you went on recently. For every five updates you post, it’s recommended that at least one is directly related to your career or personal development, that way an employer only has to scroll through your most recent updates to know you are hardworking and committed to your role.

Finally, make a note of who you are regularly engaging with on Twitter, if you are retweeting or sharing friends’ updates it’s vital that you consider how these might reflect on you. Try to engage with industry professionals or get involved with live chats to show that you are actively engaging with relevant sector conversations.

Don’t let your reputation be tarnished through social media

Social media can be great for interacting with friends, however it can also be a professional minefield so ensure you always remain conscious about how a potential employer may view your online profile, and make sure your profiles and privacy settings are all in order before beginning to search for a new role.

For more tips from the Clayton Recruitment team click here. And if you’re looking for your next role we should be talking. Get in touch today or take a look at our vacancies here.

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