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Factors to consider before deciding to move jobs

30/04/2018
Posted by: Lynn Sedgwick
Looking for a new job is a big commitment. It takes time to figure out what is out there and how that fits with your career plans. Then there are the applications, interviews and time spent investigating your options. The decision to move is not taken lightly, so if you do decide to seek a new role you want to feel reassured that it’s the best fit for you. Our blog offers some important considerations about seeking a new role to help you establish what matters to you. 

Monetary motivation


Cold hard cash is a major motivation factor when candidates consider a job move. The temptation of earning more money for the same job with a different company can prove too tempting to resist. 

It’s also worth noting that in the business world, career progression and pay scales can be much more fluid than in professions that have a clear linear structure with regards to training, qualification and experience, such as doctors or legal professionals. If money is high on your list of priorities it’s often best to look at what the individual company is offering, as pay can vary within a sector dependent on the business. 

The North-South divide is often talked about in the media; it’s true that there are broad discrepancies between take-home earnings dependent on where in the country you live and work. The Institute of Fiscal Studies published findings last year that state incomes in the South East of England are up to 25% greater than incomes in the West Midlands. If moving plays a part in your job search, the pull of big cities like London is often a major factor. It’s worth bearing in mind how location fits into your broader lifestyle desires when thinking about changing jobs. 

Non-monetary rewards


Money can be a powerful reason to leave a job, yet non-monetary rewards can be just as motivational. Things such as contributions towards a gym membership, flexible or remote working, or discounted medical cover for the employee plus dependents and a spouse can be sufficiently tempting if you’re considering a move.  
Personal perks offered by a company are often major considerations for many candidates. While London offers a fast pace of life and a vast array of career opportunities, different locations may appeal to people in different circumstances. A quieter location might be preferable for parents with children, while a job close to extended family might suit someone who helps care for a relative. Money can be tempting but personal circumstances are often a more powerful motivational force – and will likely continue to be so as our population ages and younger generations play a part in caring for elderly relations. Finding a business that supports flexible working or considers part-time hours can be invaluable and might just be the tipping point that pushes someone to jump ship.

Time, work and people management 


Management issues are often cited when candidates are looking for a new job. Important issues to think about include:

  • How workloads are managed in the business: is there enough to do – or too much?
  • Time management: are employer expectations realistic? Does the job involve long, late hours?
  • Opportunities to gain managerial experience: if training is not forthcoming and managing a team is something you’re interested in, it could be time to move on.
  • Management of the business as a whole: if you’re at a stage in your career where you’re ready to take the next step and you want to influence how the company is run, look for senior or director-level positions. If these aren’t available, it’s time to move on. 

Job titles and moving up


Career development isn’t always linear, but if you feel that your real-life responsibilities don’t match your job description you could be ready for a step up. If your employer isn’t forthcoming with dropping the ‘assistant’ from your managerial job title, and you have the necessary skills and experience, why not see what else is out there. Tread carefully though – some employers won’t hire a senior colleague without evidence of previous experience or time in a post, and it’s never a good idea to burn bridges with your current employer. 

Stay or go: your own list of reasons


There are many factors that influence the decision to stay with or leave a business. Sometimes a large issue such as the salary that a company can offer feels too big to work around and can only be resolved by a move. Equally, smaller issues that combine to make a larger picture can be just as compelling in the decision to seek a new position. 

The most important factors to consider when looking for a new job are the ones that matter to you. Whether that’s money, work/life balance, a comprehensive benefits package or proximity to family, only you can decide. Think carefully about what’s on offer in your current job and weigh that against what a different company or role can offer – and how that sits with what you want. 


If you found this blog interesting, why not have a look at our other post on How can you tell if a job is right for you? Or if you’re looking for that perfect role, then check out all the vacancies we have available, and please do register your CV with us.

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